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Born To Lie (Pinocchio) by Mark Davies


Regular price £275.00
Born To Lie (Pinocchio) by Mark Davies

Available In Two Sizes Standard Or Large


STANDARD

Limited Edition Print Of 45

Medium: Giclee On Paper

Framed Size: 25.5" x 33.5"


LARGE

Limited Edition Print Of 10

Medium: Giclee On Paper

Framed Size: 35" x 47"


No one likes a liar, no one. 

This is a boy who hasn’t been scarred by life's experiences too young, his first reaction to his creator was to laugh wildly in his face, what kind of freak does that? Geppetto was a true craftsman, a master of his trade who poured everything into creating Pinocchio only for things to turn very, very bad.

Described by his father as wretched boy, this little blaggard caused havoc and turmoil and was cast out, ring-fenced and and abandoned. Can a child really be born ‘bad’? Surely not, it must be through inherited traits that clash and conflict with bad experiences and influences that they are exposed to? But how does that explain the above? It is written that this rascal of a boy causes grief and frustration to his father and others but the fact that his first breath was a negative one means that maybe whilst creating his son, Geppetto unwittingly transferred some of his negative characteristics that had been dormant within, those that were a consequence of the pressures that he had been placed under through lifes struggles.

The craftsman is undeniably good but no one is ‘perfect’ and stress mutates and breaks out in different ways. So who is actually the victim here? This piece focuses on a frustrated and silently seething Pinocchio, sat slumped isolated and abandoned. His nose elongated and showing signs that he is still lying, the wooden limbs burn with the anger that is building within his body and mind. He knows what he is is doing is wrong, he can see the destruction and the hurt that radiates outwards but he cant seem to stop it, is it his fault? Does he choose to lie, no, not in this case, he was simply made this way. On first look you see a crisp, beautiful scene before seeing the boys’ anger and frustration but as with so many of my pieces there are signs of hope.

Once a liar always a liar right? No.


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